Fashion N Travel

TRENDING FASHION IN DJIBOUTI

TRENDING FASHION IN DJIBOUTI

Djibouti is a country in the Horn of Africa. Its official name is the Republic of Djibouti. It is bordered on the south by Somalia, on the southwest by Ethiopia, on the north by Eritrea, and on the east by the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Yemen is located across the Gulf of Aden. The country covers a total size of 23,200 square kilometers.

Djibouti is a multi-ethnic country with a population of more than 921,804 people (the smallest in mainland Africa). The official languages of the country are French and Arabic, whereas the national languages are Afar and Somali. Approximately 94 percent of inhabitants follow Islam, which is the official religion and has dominated the region for over a thousand years.

Djibouti controls access to the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean and is strategically placed near some of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. It is a major refueling and transshipment hub, as well as the primary maritime port for imports from and exports to Ethiopia. The country is a burgeoning business centre and home to a number of international military bases. Djibouti City also serves as the regional headquarters for the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD).

TRENDING FASHION IN DJIBOUTI

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ACCESSORIES IN DJIBOUTI

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TRIBES IN DJIBOUTI AND THEIR FASHION

Djibouti is a country with many ethnic groups. The two major ethnic groups are the Dir (clan) Somali (60%) and the Afar (35%). The Issas make up the majority of the Somali clan component, followed by a large group of Gadabuursi and a smaller number of Isaaq. Both are sub-clans of the greater Dir, with the Issas belonging to the Madoobe Dir and the Gadabuursi to the Madaluug Dir. Arabs, Ethiopians, and Europeans make up the remaining 5% of the population of Djibouti (French and Italians). The majority of the locals are city dwellers, with the remaining being pastoralists.

Both Somali and Afar men dress alike. Both wear sarong, usually white or plaid. More traditional men wear whhite robes with the sarong, though today it vseems to be replaced with a long scarf.

The Somalis

Nomadic pastoral tribes, loose empires, sultanates, and city-states have long existed among Somalis. Clans are major social units in Somali culture, with membership playing a vital role. Clans are patrilineal and are frequently divided into sub-clans, with multiple sub-divisions in some cases. Somali society has a long history of ethnic endogamy. Marriage is frequently to another ethnic Somali from a different clan in order to strengthen alliance relations.

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The Afars

Historically, Afar society has been divided into independent kingdoms, each ruled by its own Sultan. Pastoralists, who raise goats, sheep, and cattle in the desert, make up a small part of the society.

They are socially organized into clan families and two main classes: the asaimara (‘reds,’ who are the political dominating class, and the adoimara (‘whites,’ who live in the Mabla Mountains).

The Afar are also renowned for their martial prowess. The jile, a well-known curved knife, is usually worn by men. They also have a large collection of fight songs.

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TOURIST AND HISTORICAL PLACES IN DJIBOUTI

Tadjoura – It is one of the oldest towns on Africa’s east coast, dating back to at least the 12th century.

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Place Menelik – the hotel has a club on the ground floor and it is a decent place for those who want to have a drink in an ambient.

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Lake Assal – The crater lake “Honey Lake” is located at the western extremity of the Gulf of Tadjoura. It is the second lowest land depression on Earth, behind the Dead Sea, at 155 meters below sea level.

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Dorale’ and Khor Ambado – From here, you may go on fantastic local sightseeing trips and participate in a variety of water sports.

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Hanle’ Plain – The lowland valley is flanked on all sides by rugged mountains and is home to a number of small freshwater lakes. It’s another fantastic spot for birdwatchers, with Egyptian Goose, black crake, and three banded plovers can be seen.

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Goba’ad Plain – Goba’ad is the only area in Djibouti where ostriches are actively breeding. There are also Black Crown Sparrows, Arabian Bustards, Sand Grouses, Crombec, and a plethora of other birds.

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Djibouti City – Djibouti City is used for a variety of purposes. For starters, it’s an excellent staging point for trips into the countryside or out on the water. Second, it provides a modest dosage of relief when you return from your excursions.

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Day Forest National Park – The bright colors of the Djibouti desert abound in this massive oasis. Nature lovers will fall in love with Day Forest National Park, which is located 20 kilometers from the Gulf of Tadjoura.

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Hamoudi Mosque – a traditional mosque in center of Djibouti. Old style and unique Arab architecturein this area.

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The Gulf of Tadjoura – The Gulf of Tadjoua, which is flanked by the beautiful Goda Mountains, which reach heights of up to 1300 meters, is regarded by those who have visited as the ideal location for diving and snorkeling with whale sharks.

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Ali Sabieh – Ali Sabieh is bordered on all sides by awe-inspiring desert.

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Tropical Aquarium – This is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country and one of the best in Africa. It’s made to make you feel as though you’re underwater in the Red Sea, getting up close and personal with the marine species that inhabits this unique body of water.

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MUSIC IN DJIBOUTI

Somali songs are usually the result of collaboration between lyricists (midho), songwriters (laxan), and singers, and may be traced back to the late 1940s in Djibouti (codka or “voice”). Balwo is a popular Somali musical style in Djibouti that focuses on love themes. They perform song and dance from two of Djibouti’s main ethnic groups (Somali and Afar), appear on Djiboutian radio and television shows on a regular basis, and travel the world as representatives of Djiboutian culture. This festival attracts artists from all around the country, and live recordings of the festival’s headliners have proven to be a hit with international audiences. The Dinkara and Adarous are two of the most well-known performers. Several groups committed to the preservation of traditional culture and dance are funded by the government.

The tanbura, bowl lyre, and oud are all native Djiboutian instruments.

Some musicians in Djibouti include:

Sally

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Some art work in Djibouti include:

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mutual art

MEALS IN DJIBOUTI

Mukbaza – a kind of folded bread, that after being cooked, is cut into pieces and blended with honey and banana or dates.

Sabayaad – it is made of a dough of flour, water and salt.

Djiboutiennes – a nutritious flatbread served with runny butter or honey.

Digaag – a delicious Djiboutian rice dish made with fish or chicken.

Xalwo – a treat made during special occasions such as weddings etc.

Djiboutian lamb stew – a nationaldish in Djibouti, made of rice, lamb and ayurvedic spices.

Mukbaza

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Sabayaad

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Djiboutiennes

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Digaag

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Xalwo

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Djiboutian lamb stew

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Cambaboor – it is prepared with onion, garlic, corn flour and enhanced with nigella or anise seeds.

Djiboutian banana fritters – it is prepared with ripe bananas, flour and little nutmeg.

Sambuussa – this a perfect appetizer with which to start your meal.

Cambaboor

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Djiboutian banana fritters

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Sambuussa

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION AND HABITAT PROTECTION IN DJIBOUTI

 According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Djibouti is wooded to the tune of 0.3 percent, or around 6,000 hectares. Biodiversity and Protected Areas: According to the World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Djibouti has 509 identified species of amphibians, birds, mammals, and reptiles. 0.4 percent are endemic, meaning they can only be found in one country, while 2.0 percent are endangered. There are at least 826 vascular plant species in Djibouti, with 0.7 percent of them being endemic. IUCN classifications I-V safeguard 0.5 percent of Djibouti’s land.

Day Forest National Park is located in Djibouti’s Goda Mountains and Tadjourah Region.

The Forêt du Day National Park, along with Mount Mabla, is one of Djibouti’s two remaining closed protected forest regions. In a sea of semi-desert, it shelters a significant forest island.

Juniperus procera, Olea africana, Buxus hildebrandtii, and Tarchonanthus camphoratus are the four major tree species. Doum Palms can be found in the western half of the plain of Hanle, towards the foot of Gamarré and on the outskirts of the plain of Gagadé. With increasing height, the vegetation becomes more abundant. An ancient juniper forest, ficus, mimosa, wild olive trees, boxwood, dragon trees, and other native plants occupy the set of Day and its extension to the crest of Goda.

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EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN DJIBOUTI

 Greater temperatures, increased aridity, lower precipitation, and rising sea levels are all projected to have negative consequences for Djibouti as a result of climate change. Water resources, agriculture and livestock, coastal zones, health, and tourism industries will all be affected by socioeconomic and environmental consequences. In 2016, Djibouti submitted its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the UNFCCC in support of the country’s efforts to achieve economic development goals, reduce drought vulnerability, protect the country from rising sea levels, improve water access, protect biodiversity, and strengthen rural population resilience.

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GENDER EQUALITY IN DJIBOUTI

 The constitution of Djibouti, which was approved in 1992, stipulates that everyone is equal in the eyes of the law, regardless of gender, language, origin, ethnicity, or religion. Nonetheless, there are significant differences between men and women, which are most noticeable in the workplace. Women make up only 19% of the workforce, compared to 81 percent of men.

Some prominent women in Djibouti include:

 

Dr Halima Abubakar – a referring medical doctor at Yonis Toussaint AIDS centre in Djibouti city.

Aicha Mohamed Robleh – a djiboutian writer and former Minister of promotion of Women, Family well-being and Social Affairs.

Hibo Bacha –founder of 3 businesses, a beauty centre for women, a travel agency for tourism/cargo and a professional real estate agency.

Xabiiba Cabdilaahi – a prominent Djibouti singer.

Dr Halima Abubaka

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Aicha Mohamed Robleh

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Hibo Bacha

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Xabiiba Cabdilaahi

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Moumina Houmed Hassan – Djiboutian politician serving as the country’s Minister for women and the Family.

Hawa Ahmed Youssouf – Djiboutian civil serveant and politician.

Hasna Barkat Daoud – Djiboutian lawyer and former government minister.

Safia Elmi Djibril – Djiboutian politician and women’s right activist.

Moumina Houmed Hassan

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Hawa Ahmed Youssouf

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Hasna Barkat Daoud

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Safia Elmi Djibril

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